Is snoring damaging your teeth?

It’s National Stop Snoring Week – easier said than done… which is why most of us don’t do anything about our snoring habit. It is often our partners that suffer the most anyway! However, you may be suffering more than you realise…

Do you brush your teeth twice a day, visit the dentist regularly and eat a healthy diet? Yet you are still frustrated and disappointed after visiting the dentist? How can you possibly need another filling…?

If you snore, it may be that this nocturnal habit is causing more damage than you realise.  That deafening gurgling grunting sound that we make when sleeping is caused by the muscles in the roof of your mouth, tongue and throat relaxing. It is these soft tissues that vibrate when the air flows past. This relaxation and the fact your mouth is most likely to be open when sleeping can cause a lack of salivary flow in your mouth. It is saliva that is your first defence against bad breathe, infections, tooth decay and gum disease. Ah ha!

1.       Saliva washes dead skin cells off your tongue, cheeks and gums. If not washed off these cells breakdown and begin to smell.

2.       Without saliva, harmful bacteria from food & drink can grow too quickly. These bacteria can cause infections and sores.

3.       The acids in your mouth produced by plaque are neutralised by saliva, and food particles are washed away. Without a sufficient flow these acids can lead to tooth decay and gum disease.

4.       A dry mouth can lead to a burning sensation in more extreme cases.

Continuing with a good oral health routine will help to combat some of these effects. Additionally, it is something that you can explore with your dentist who may be able to adjust the bite of your teeth or recommend an appliance to ease your snoring.

If your mouth is not as healthy as you would like it to be, please don’t hesitate to contact us to see how Dental at MediatCityUK can help you.  You can make an appointment by calling 0161 207 3655 or message us using the form on the contact page. 

 

Sources:

http://www.colgate.com/en/us/oc/oral-health/conditions/respiratory-conditions/article/what-causes-snoring-its-effect-on-oral-health-0713

http://www.britishsnoring.co.uk/national_stop_snoring_week_2017.php